• http://www.slowminded.weebly.com Diogo Almeida Lopes

    Beyerdynamic TG V35d s

    Great performance!

  • Pingback: Four Great Budget Microphones for DJsUniqueSquared Pro Audio Blog

  • Arnau Naw

    I would go for an hipercardioid pattern instead of a cardioid. Because rejection is at 120 degrees instead of 180, which points more directively to the monitors booth. Which usually are at the right and left of the booth.

    • Arnau Naw

      Shure Beta58, or the cheaper akg p5, might be good examples.

  • Spook, The

    Sennheiser – never liked them. They often sound like tin cans and I’ve had a few break down.

    AT – one can do better, but their rep has come up in the world. Get an SM 57 or 58 (Protip: in the 90s the Shure was subcontracted to do the Radio Shack house brand, which were SM-57s under the grill).

    Numark’s is in the microphone game? Skip it. A mic should help you sound awesome. Don’t go cheap or buy a used real mic for the same price. I’ve found beaten old EVs and AKGs for the same price that’ll outlast this thing and sound AWESOME.

    The AKG is acceptable, but I’ve heard better from them (once again, shop used mics; goods ones last forever).

    I recently picked up some EV PL-44s for 50 a piece (got ‘em on sale; they run 75ish new). I’m impressed with that model and use it for my mobile business (good for people who don’t know how to use a mic).

    The EV 635a is still in production, goes for 100 new and will blow every mic in this article away. Substitute one of these for a hammer, build house with it and it’ll STILL sound awesome in 30 years. The 635a was built for field reporters and doesn’t get much “handling noise,” but the big thing is to learn how to respect and handle a mic to begin with. Don’t cup it, bump it, finger-drum it or tap the grill (is this thing on?), etc.

    Also, back to respecting your mic and system DO NOT use the on/off switch when the mic is potted up. Hear that popping sound? Nope, it’s not good for your system. Don’t be afraid to buy a mic without an on/off. You kids know how to use faders and pots.

  • DJ Rigo

    I can understand that you may have not have had anything new to say about the SM58 or SM57, but I think you fail to fully inform your audience by not demonstrated how the product deemed as the equally priced industry standard competes with the mics that you are introducing in this article/video.

    • Fuller

      I totally agree. IMO, this article should be prefaced with a message acknowledging that the SM57/SM58 (and 2-3 others) are industry standards that have been earning their reputations for longer than half the people on this board have been alive and should be the go-to pick, unless you have a specific reason to get something else (and I’d argue against including an on/off switch in the criteria…).

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • https://soundcloud.com/sam-steensen samsteeno

    RØDE M1 ($100-120) beats anything. Just as, if not more, durable than an SM58. Better sounding than any other of my dynamic vocal microphones, and looks great!

    • lesterhein

      I had a couple of these and I loved the tone, but I always found that I had to push them harder than the SM58s in the mix if it was on a budget board, which often lead to pops and plosives.

      Fantastic build quality and great sound, but it deserves a good pre-amp to really make it shine.

  • Andy Taylor

    Any budget mic review needs a mention of the xm8500. So cheap, good sound and as rubust as an SM58. The only downside is no switch… Behringer http://www.studiospares.com/mics-vocalist/behringer-ultravoice-xm8500/invt/381120?source=215_74&gclid=CJzO0YvhiL4CFWzHtAod33kAfQ

    • https://soundcloud.com/sam-steensen samsteeno

      I can’t agree man, I was mixing sound at a youth event about 6 months ago, and the singer brought his own mic (xm8500) covered in coloured tape, and I didn’t realise he was using an alternate to my Beta58s until I heard it. Usually dynamic microphones have minimal/subtle sound quality differences; however this microphone sounded horrible, all muddy lower mids, really cluttered sounding, and really hard to EQ. Once I swapped the Beta58 back he sounded great.

  • DJ Rojas

    I have a Peavey Pvi for 14 years that I really like. So when I needed a second mic, I got the Peavey PVi2. I am impressed with the quality, they both are dynamic and have metal bodies. They have very low if any handling noise. Price is about 50 bucks.

  • Toontown

    I’m also a fan of the Shure PG58. It’s the budget line for Shure, so it’s not as nice/loud as the SM58, but it’s definitely better than that Numark piece for only $20 more.

    • Jim Davis

      +1 on the PG58. I’m a mobile DJ that is on the mic a lot for weddings (bridal party intros, etc.) and it’s solid. I recently bought a BLX wireless set with the PG58 version handheld as well… $300 here in the US. Also great.

  • DJSteveLozzi

    Shure makes a few very budget friendly mic’s. I own is the PG-48, which has always served me well and feels as if it’s a $100 mic. Sound is clear, carrys through a room of people, etc. Only flaw is you have to hold it within 6 inches from your mouth as it won’t pick up your voice if its too far away, but where else would you be holding it??? It was $40, with a case & cable…can’t beat that!

  • Grandmaster George Bush

    SM58 or Beta 58A – industry standards, inexpensive but good resale value, versatile (can be used for other things – vocalists, instruments, etc.), built like tanks. I have a Sennheiser 835 S also, and although Senn makes great stuff in general, this is really not an impressive microphone from a sound quality point of view.

  • http://www.JAM1PHOTO.com/ JAM ONE

    I highly recommend the Behringer XM-8500

  • calgarc

    SM57. SM57. SM57. SM57. SM57. :D

    • Toontown

      I’ve used it a ton to mic instruments (literally every instrument you can think of) and only use it for vocals when necessary, but it’s a great mic.

      • calgarc

        ive used from everything to drums to recording vocal demos, acoustic instruments you name it :D

    • lesterhein

      Lots of love for the 57 here too, but I found that it didn’t work very well on male lead vox. It just sounds… dead and doesn’t have the warmth of the 58. I guess the cheese word would be that it’s not as “creamy”

      Not bad on female leads. Great for backup and an absolute star on drums.

  • Gabriel Rodriguez

    I bought an Shure SM-48 for less than $50 and have loved it ever since. Does the job for DJ and is great quality.

  • Oddie O’Phyle

    i love my e840, it’s a solid piece for gear.

  • TheQuakerOatsGuy

    The SM-58 is $99, isn’t it? Surprised it’s not on there. Thanks for the suggestions. I’ve been looking for a good back-up mic.

    • Chris Brackley

      I did put a whole paragraph in the article talking about why the SM58 wasn’t in the review…

      It’s been around for so long; everyone knows it, and knows it’s great. This was never meant to be a comprehensive round-up of the whole market, just 4 mics out there that might be worth looking at. ;)

      • Carter Sullivan-Irwin

        I’m an audio tech first and a DJ/VJ second, and the SM-58 is the ONLY budget mic I recommend to people. Its super durable, has a good frequency range, and provides a quality sound for the price. I understand its been around forever, but there is a reason its the standard for budget mics in the industry for so long.

        • TheQuakerOatsGuy

          Dang. I, sir, am a genius. Sorry about that. Great article, by the way.

  • PJ Villaflor

    I personally prefer an Audix OM2 for these reasons. It’s $99; it sounds
    comparable to an SM58 with maybe a bit more gain; its hyper-cardioid
    which rejects more feedback than the SM58, more comparable to the
    Beta58; and the head is a built in shock mount that is designed to
    bounce when dropped making it more durable than most microphones in it’s
    price range. I’m surprised it’s not on the list.

    • Chris Brackley

      That Audix certainly looks good.

      For this review, the mics I sourced were based on suggestions from retailers and DJs that I know, and Audix never came up. Perhaps they aren’t so big here in the UK.

      If we look at mics again in the future, I’ll be sure to check out their range.