• http://twitter.com/Inofaith Tobias ‘Inofaith’

    Not recommendable, compress and limit music even more? when it’s already lacking dynamics.
    Protip: Good quality music (and profesionally mastered) + a real decent sound system, like Funktion One = transparent good sound.

    It’s better to have nothing to correct in the first place.

  • http://invdj.co.cc/ Invdj

    just to add:

    SAVIHost is a little derivate of VSTHost that
    has been crafted for the sole purpose of automatically loading exactly one VSTi.

  • Boobs

    Yes but I think he is suggesting older tracks that are not squashed to oblivion will benefit. A lot off pll used to stick Vintage warmer at the end of the master in live when mixing in that.

  • PAUL

    Would you recomend using a apogee duet to improve the sound ?

  • MP

    Super Duper Post! Thanks!

  • Armando C

    Timecode + Jack Audio = no go

  • SmiTTTen

    These videos are spot on – Highly recommend checking them out.

  • SmiTTTen

    These videos are spot on – Highly recommend checking them out.

  • http://twitter.com/pkaulf P

    Sorry, but this is terrible advice – dance music is already over-compressed as it is, and if a track has been mastered properly it shouldn’t need any further compression or EQ. Any final EQing or limiting on the entire mix should be handled by the engineer responsible for the club’s sound system, not the DJ.

    • http://www.facebook.com/Livewyr3 Justin Turner

      they’re talking about a mix to be recorded and posted online, not for live use.

  • daveq

    these recommendations really are overkill.  If you are playing a place where consideration of the room really is an issue then there will be in an in house sound engineer who will manage EQ and compression for you as the last part of the signal chain. If you are playing in any place smaller than that (where there is no need for an engineer) - just watch your gain levels on your tracks, use your mixer EQ sensitively and you’ll be fine.

    using technology to improve our craft is great but we are getting to a point where there is a limited return but a huge additional burden of complexity to manage. 

  • daveq

    these recommendations really are overkill.  If you are playing a place where consideration of the room really is an issue then there will be in an in house sound engineer who will manage EQ and compression for you as the last part of the signal chain. If you are playing in any place smaller than that (where there is no need for an engineer) - just watch your gain levels on your tracks, use your mixer EQ sensitively and you’ll be fine.

    using technology to improve our craft is great but we are getting to a point where there is a limited return but a huge additional burden of complexity to manage. 

  • Audiomontana

    I handle all the PA for my Party Crew.  Sometimes Ill have 10 Djs on a line up.. they might change every twenty minutes.   So the sound variety and the input types change very quickly.   Even with every DJ running some kind of rediculous re-routing out of traktor into various filters and compressors and mastering chains  .. thier sound cards might differ in out put volume so much that it would be completely meaningless for them to go through the trouble and possible system crashes that might occur during the show which is most importantly …. pleasing the audience and not burning thier ears out.  Ive been working on a signal chain for a while that goes like this … DBX 386a tube pre-amp and digital converter.   All signals come out of a top nothch xone 92 — our main DJ mixer  and go into the tube PRE … there it gets the boost and warmth it might need and alot of the differant types of signal get a nice tube brushing. I have a side chain of EQaulization and two very simple mono compressors .. dbx 160a  that give the fast attack and release limiting that I need to protect my equipment and keep the signal from overloading the digital conversion that takes place after it re-enters the 386.   The 386 uses some shaping algorythims and a sort of digital overload compression as it converts the signal … fattening up the signal rather than creating digital distortion.. im not sure exactly what it is .. but it doesn’t sound like crap when its too loud… from the 386 it travels via aes ebu cable at 96 khz or 44.1  into my motu 896 mk3  where it gets converted and possibly recorded if necessary.  also the motu handles the clocking for the 386 –  very few hiccups.  From the motu it travels again by aes cable into a sabine 8808 system controller where it is split up into the various signals that supply my speaker system.   This isn’t very complicated and it really puts a mastered but not flattened sound on the party crew.    We can record a demo straight off the xone that doesn’t get all crazey on the levels and it makes alot of people really happy to hear thier set all under-control — when they could only hear thier own volume changes through the monitors.  Monitors are direct feeds off the 92. 

  • Scalawag

    TORQ is the winner here!!!!

  • Fakexican

    How would you route this just using the built in mac soundcard?  Whenever I try to do it and play the songs I just get this nasty noise everytime i play a track

    • TimRoth

      That’s probably your sound card not keeping up. If you’re doing internal mixing, you should expect to spend $3-500 on ebay for an audio interface that can give you low latency, quality audio. I go from traktor into ableton, and then I A/B out to my 2 channel dj mixer, and back in to a return track.

      I’m doing that so I can a) use my silky smooth faders, and b) my mixer has a really good send/return loop to go out to my KP3. By going into ableton I can also mix in me playing a drum kit or instrument in kore, and whatever else I want. With kore you can really pump up a song by grabbing a synth and playing a melody on top of it. It helps to glue the tracks together too when you’re fading between songs, because you can keep a rhythm, and morph it on the fly. I’m experimenting with live sampling 4 bars in maschine and then mapping it to pads. It’s a cool way to chop up loops live. Ableton lets me have eq with sweepable mids for each channel, compression, and whatever else I want. So I save ~$4000 not having to buy a good mixer and rack units. But the only reason I can do that is I spent $600 on a sound card that will let me pump sound through it super quick. For me anyway, more than 7ms of lag messes up my sense of timing.

    • TimRoth

      That’s probably your sound card not keeping up. If you’re doing internal mixing, you should expect to spend $3-500 on ebay for an audio interface that can give you low latency, quality audio. I go from traktor into ableton, and then I A/B out to my 2 channel dj mixer, and back in to a return track.

      I’m doing that so I can a) use my silky smooth faders, and b) my mixer has a really good send/return loop to go out to my KP3. By going into ableton I can also mix in me playing a drum kit or instrument in kore, and whatever else I want. With kore you can really pump up a song by grabbing a synth and playing a melody on top of it. It helps to glue the tracks together too when you’re fading between songs, because you can keep a rhythm, and morph it on the fly. I’m experimenting with live sampling 4 bars in maschine and then mapping it to pads. It’s a cool way to chop up loops live. Ableton lets me have eq with sweepable mids for each channel, compression, and whatever else I want. So I save ~$4000 not having to buy a good mixer and rack units. But the only reason I can do that is I spent $600 on a sound card that will let me pump sound through it super quick. For me anyway, more than 7ms of lag messes up my sense of timing.

  • Dustydna

    I use Platinum Notes software to remaster all my music through a series of similar filters into WAV.  It seems to do most of this (not the vintage effects of course) is that a possible solution as well?

  • Insurgent DJs

    Good article… One caveat though: While using Jack to route, you cannot use timecode in TSP2 without removing sound card checks in the application itself. Unfortunately reverse-engineering is required, and I’ve fought tooth and nail with a few NI-employed mods on the DJTT forums to get this fixed, and nobody’s interested. Instead, legit users that want to route while using timecode had better learn x86 asm (and reposition their moral compass). :(

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Robert-Rodriguez/520347367 Robert Rodriguez

      You can use timecode using jackrouter. I use them in my configuration. 

  • Zac Kyoti

    Hey Chris, good article. Glad to hear mention of Jack – I love it, and it’s an essential part of my rig. I’ve never had any issues with it, and I think it’s much more flexible than Soundflower. As for PSP VintageWarmer, I find that introducing that into the signal chain creates unacceptable latency for djing – have you noticed that? Great for studio work though. For a low latency warm-up, I like to use a BBE D82 vst, and Ableton’s native eq, saturator, opto compressor (very light settings) and a limiter, in that order. I set the levels so that the limiter almost never engages. Works well to fatten and smooth.

    • http://www.ohdratdigital.com Chris

      Hi Zac – the ‘full fat’ vintage warmer definitely adds a bit much but the LE is more subtle, I feel there’s a ‘your mileage may vary’ moral to the story with this method in general because one’s style dictates how much latency you can put up with, to a certain extent. Thanks for the tips I look forward to giving them a go!

  • Ola Persson

    Sounds like terrible advice, most music nowadays is already squashed lifeless with compression, limiting and distortion. Adding even more on top is not a good idea. What you’d want to do is matching the RMS values of your tracks, that’ll get you fairly close an even and nice sounding mix. Besides there’s already a limiter on traktors output, and it’s set fairly aggressive already. Unless you’re playing unmastered material, you are very likely to do more harm than good.

    • Zac Kyoti

      That’s definitely a point people need to consider. Mixing via proper gain structuring is the first skill djs should learn.  Overuse of compression on already super-compressed tracks will make things sound bad, fast. I think the key is to really learn compression inside and out. I use a compressor on my master out, but I set everything to be really light, smooth. No hard knees, small ratios. It only kicks in during loud mixed sections. It IS a trade off, but if you do it right, you won’t wreck your sound. You do add a touch more compression to already compressed tracks (only at mix points), but you benefit by smoothing out dense mixes.

  • http://claimid.com/bartl Bart

    I thought Traktor has a limiter on the master out already? Why do you need another one?

  • Anonymous

    Nice article Chris. 

    I’ve also not had major luck with Jack or even Virtual Audio Cable. Both seem to cause issues with the sound and Traktor (with S4). It could be how I set it up though or the hardware, so I wouldn’t say it is the software at this point. This article makes me want to keep trying though. Thanks!

    scamo

  • Anonymous

    Nice article Chris. 

    I’ve also not had major luck with Jack or even Virtual Audio Cable. Both seem to cause issues with the sound and Traktor (with S4). It could be how I set it up though or the hardware, so I wouldn’t say it is the software at this point. This article makes me want to keep trying though. Thanks!

    scamo

  • Anonymous

    Nice article Chris. 

    I’ve also not had major luck with Jack or even Virtual Audio Cable. Both seem to cause issues with the sound and Traktor (with S4). It could be how I set it up though or the hardware, so I wouldn’t say it is the software at this point. This article makes me want to keep trying though. Thanks!

    scamo

  • http://www.facebook.com/matti.kiviniemi Matti Kiviniemi

    I am personally not super-keen on Jack as it tends to have a bit of Lag & crashes my system from time to time. I would propably opt for using hardware EQ & Compressor added onto the end of the chain. Kerry Chandler & many more use it & seems to be a dope way to keep the sound consistent on using old & new trax. 

    When using mp3 I put all the tracks through an app called switch that has a normalise function available. that helps pretty much just to cover the bases. 

  • john zaplin

    i tried jack with Babya AU Host plus PSP Vintage Warmer plus Traktor and i cant get the audio get through the host software. any tips? 

  • john zaplin

    i tried jack with Babya AU Host plus PSP Vintage Warmer plus Traktor and i cant get the audio get through the host software. any tips? 

  • john zaplin

    i tried jack with Babya AU Host plus PSP Vintage Warmer plus Traktor and i cant get the audio get through the host software. any tips? 

    • http://www.ohdratdigital.com Chris

      Yep – ignore my brain fart on this one ;) Go with Rax or Reaper. Rax is more dedicated to this task, Reaper is more fully featured and won’t expire on you in 15 days…

    • http://www.ohdratdigital.com Chris

      Yep – ignore my brain fart on this one ;) Go with Rax or Reaper. Rax is more dedicated to this task, Reaper is more fully featured and won’t expire on you in 15 days…

  • Ito

    Brand new site! Just saw it right now, and you still got me DJTT. Good article, but for an amateur like me, I miss some praticle examples. Anyway, you guys keep me going back every week. Thanks a lot! 
    Greetings from Brazil (hey Ean, you should come to play someday)

    • Nico235

      One word for those interested in a kick ass ultra low latency AU host: AULab. It’s part of the develloper tools of OSX. Used to be free, version didn’t change with Lion. You can use the app independently of Xcode being installed. Find a friend that has the devtools installed, zip the app and grab the archive..

  • http://ax11.myopenid.com/ Tom

    Hey, I didn’t know Jack was ported to Windows. I have been using it for
    years on my Linux machine. You could, by the way, run a Linux Live
    system (no install required, runs from CD/DVD or USB-stick) on a second
    computer as a real time sound processor. Does not need to be the newest
    one, just a decent audio card. (PCI cards with 24bit/96kHz are dirt
    cheap now). There are even specialized Loonix live distributions for
    that purpose, like dyne::bolic. As they are all free as in “free beer”
    there’s no risk in trying. Worst case you lose some time. best case you
    get some independent recording/mastering hardware for scraps.  

  • http://www.facebook.com/madjesta Phillip Madjester Whelan

    it’s great you guys are mentioning JACK, which is one of the coolest audio things out there for Linux. For those brave enough to try mixing in Linux, I belive there are some VST hosts  for JACK, like fvst, which use WINE. Of course setting this up is hardly an easy task.